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Louisiana Republicans Fear Expanded Bestiality Law Would Lead to More Gay Butt Sex

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By John Wright

Republicans are fighting an effort to strengthen Louisiana’s bestiality law, because they fear it is part of an underhanded effort to repeal the state’s unconstitutional ban on sodomy.

Louisiana’s current “Crimes Against Nature” statute prohibits “the unnatural carnal copulation by a human being with another of the same sex or opposite sex or with an animal.”

A proposal to strengthen the bestiality law would remove the words “or with an animal” from the Crimes Against Nature ban, and create a new statute with requirements for mental evaluations and penalties for trafficking.

However, the Associated Press reports that GOP lawmakers fear the proposal would “untangle” the bestiality law from the sodomy ban.

“This bill was written because the far left wants to undermine our other laws that protect family and traditional values that the people of Louisiana hold dear,” said Sen. Ryan Gatti, a Republican who was one of 10 senators to vote against the bill. “That was our concern, that it most likely will be used as a Trojan horse to delete the sodomy law.”

The ban on sodomy, of course, was struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court in Lawrence v. Texas in 2003. However, as recently as 2013, the sheriff in Baton Rouge attempted to enforce the ban, one of a dozen or so that remain on the books nationwide. In 2014, the Lousiana House voted against repealing the sodomy ban due to pressure from the powerful Christian Louisiana Family Forum.

The Associated Press notes that while the expanded bestiality law passed the Senate 25-10, its fate in the House remains uncertain because the Family Forum opposes it.

“I think the provisions of his bill go way too far,” said Gene Mills, president of the group.

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John Wright

John Wright is the editor of OutSmart magazine. He has spent two decades in the mainstream and LGBTQ media. Most recently, he served as senior editor of Dallas Voice, and covered LGBTQ issues in the state Legislature for The Texas Observer. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Wright earned his bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Florida. He resides in the EaDo area of Houston, where he is currently remodeling a 1930s row house.

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